Capital City Farm was transformed into a free area for people to pick fresh produce and flowers. Trentonians came from across the city to join the farm’s first yearly Harvest Festival, which took place before the first frost of the winter season.

Walter Roberts Jr., a farmer of land, is one of two that takes care of the crops and flowers for Trentonians to pick. The event ran from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. and hosted found different artists showing live paintings. The farm is normally open from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturdays, 11 a.m -1 pm on Mondays, 10:30 a.m to 1 pm on Tuesdays and 11:30 a.m to 1 p.m on Thursdays. Residents are welcome to come and pick every vegetation within its acres. 

Jacqui Ivey, a Board member on the garden state agricultural department, explained that more people should come and use the grounds.  “We’re just grateful to see people from the community come out from the neighborhood and we’re hoping to see more of this,” Ivey said. 

The Harvest Festival gave out free pumpkins to all who came. Photo | Drew Mumich

The festival saw children and adults alike paint pumpkins; listen to music; and enjoy homemade food made by Trenton chef Yvonne Mitchell using the farm’s own produce. The most fun came by picking and munching on tomatoes and sweet green beans.

Bernice A Mitchell, a first-time attendee, talked about how she was enjoying picking flowers for her dining room table.  “I’m a big kid…I like fresh flowers. I put them on my table every day,” Mitchell said showing a bouquet of red, orange, and pink fall flowers. “They are so beautiful in the range of flowers. The live music that was out was absolutely amazing.“ 

Capital City Farm is Trenton’s first commercial urban farm, created under the leadership of D&R Greenway Land Trust in partnership with an advisory group of seven Trenton-based organizations.The farm partners with local restaurants and Trenton Area Soup Kitchen to feed people in the city healthy and nutritious meals. The next plan for the farm is to create a variety of products representing the diversity of the city as well as a meditation sanctuary for residents to just sit and relax at. The farm is operated by the Mercer County Park Commission. The farmers are Park Commission employees.