The Trent House Association will present a talk by Ridgeley Hutchinson on his documentary on slavery in New Jersey, which was recently produced by Truehart Productions and New Jersey’s Public Broadcasting System.

This free program will be held on Tuesday, July 19th, 2022, at 6:30 pm via Zoom at https://tinyurl.com/THTalkJuly19.  A pay-as-you-wish donation can be made through PayPal at https://williamtrenthouse.org/donation.html.

Part 1 of the documentary “The Price of Silence, The Forgotten Story of New Jersey’s Enslaved People,” aired on New Jersey PBS in June, introducing the history of slavery in New Jersey beginning in the 1600s. Part 2 is expected to be aired in late August. Part 2 will tell the heart wrenching story of the Van Wickle slave ring that took in place in New Jersey in 1818 after the Gradual Abolition Act of 1804 and then move on to how the lingering effects of slavery are still being felt by the African American community today. Ridgeley Hutchinson, the documentary’s producer, will describe the story behind the production with illustrations from Part 1 of the film.

Ridgeley Hutchinson is President and CFO of Truehart Productions, a nonprofit corporation formed in 2019 to produce a documentary revealing the prevalence of slavery in New Jersey since colonial times and its lasting effects throughout the state during the 20th century. Mr. Hutchinson was formerly the Executive Director of the Northeast Carpenters Apprentice Training and Education Fund. He now serves on the Community Advisory board of NJ PBS and is Vice-Chairman of the board of NJ’s Educational Facilities Authority, a position he has held for 12 years.

The William Trent House Museum is a National Historic Landmark in the Crossroads of the American Revolution National Heritage Area and on the Washington-Rochambeau Revolutionary Route National Historic Trail. The Museum is dedicated to sharing the authentic history of the house, property, and people with our communities, connecting the past with today and tomorrow. Owned by the City of Trenton, it is operated by the Trent House Association, which is supported by the generosity of its members and donors; by grants from the New Jersey Council for the Humanities, the New Jersey Cultural Trust, the New Jersey Historic Trust, and the Mercer County Cultural and Heritage Commission with funding from the New Jersey Historical Commission; and by contributions from NJM Insurance Group and Orion General Contractors. For more information, visit https://williamtrenthouse.org.